With the temps on the rise, you’re likely sweating more, making it harder to stay hydrated

When performance training heats up, you’re likely sweating more, making it harder to stay hydrated during workouts. Drink more cold water during your workout to help regulate the body temperature. It keeps your core temperature cooler for longer, reducing heat-related stress and fatigue. Here’s how it works:

 Why You Should Drink Cold Water During Exercise

Why You Should Drink Cold Water During Exercise

Sweat Is More Than Water

Here’s a tip to replace what’s lost in sweat, you need more than just water. Traditional sports drinks are often too low in electrolytes and nutrients to cover sweat loss. We formulated Catalyte Isotonic with the typical ratios of sodium found in sweat and a blend of potassium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc, which is lost in sweat, but rarely in electrolyte products.
 
In addition, research shows that rehydration beverages containing between 2-4% carbohydrates allow for faster absorption and rehydration. Catalyte Isotonic is 2% carbohydrates, whereas traditional sports drinks can contain between 6-8% carbohydrates.

 Sweat Is More Than Water

Sweat Is More Than Water

Don't Fear Fat

Don’t fear fat. Fats are actually critical to good health, releasing energy slowly to keep the body satiated while regulating blood sugar. Fat also provides powerful nutrients and antioxidants necessary for cellular repair of joints, organs, skin and hair. The trick to fat is understanding what types of fat your body needs, like Omega-3 fatty acids, and in what quantity. Learn more.

 Good Fats vs. Bad Fats

Good Fats vs. Bad Fats

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential nutrients

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are both essential nutrients, meaning that your body does not produce them (either at all or in insufficient quantities), yet it needs them, so they must be consumed through food or supplements. Proponents of diets high in omega-3 fatty acids claim an amazing range of benefits. Learn more about obtaining a balance of omega-3 and omega-6

 The Complete Guide to Omega Fatty Acids

The Complete Guide to Omega Fatty Acids

How do you know if you’re consuming enough omega-3 from food alone?

 The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Dietary Reference Intake suggests that men consume 1.6 grams and women consume 1.1 grams of omega-3 (EPA and DHA combined) daily. While there are no current recommendations for EPA or DHA separately, research suggests consumption of 1-2 grams/day of EPA and DHA at a ratio of 2:1 may be beneficial in counteracting exercise-induced inflammation and maintenance of cellular integrity for overall athlete health. Try these foods first to consume your daily recommended omega-3, and when food falls short, try either fish oil or gelcaps.

 Everything You Need to Know About Unsaturated Fats

Everything You Need to Know About Unsaturated Fats